Printed from "Life in the Tech Lab" site

Fast Food Fun

Objective: Use the Internet and spreadsheets to analyze the nutritional value of a typical fast food meal.

Step 1: Nutritional Information

Read this information from TeensHealth to learn what makes a meal healthy. Pay close attention to the part of the article that explains how many calories we should get from fat in our meal. We will be using this information to create charts that will help us evaluate how healthy our meal is.

Now use this handy nutrition calculator to determine how many calories you need each day. Once you have determined how many you should consume in a day, be sure to write it down in your Tech Journal so you don't forget it.

Step 2: Create a Table to Record Information

Open up Microsoft Excel and create a table with headings that looks like this:

Template for Nutritional Table

Save your spreadsheet in your Documents folder. Call it YOUR NAME FFF.

Keep this table open so you can record data into it as you create your meal in Step 3.

Step 3: Create and Record Your Meal

Decide which fast food restaurant you would like to visit. Click on that restaurant's web site below. Once there, create a meal with a sandwich, salad or other main dish, a side dish (french fries, etc), a drink, and a dessert. For each item on your menu, record the total calories, the calories from fat, and the total grams of fat in the table you created in Step 2.

Your meal must contain at least five (5) items!

McDonald's: http://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/full_menu_explorer.html

Jack in the Box: http://www.jackinthebox.com/nutrition/

Wendy's: http://www.wendys.com/food/NutritionLanding.jsp

Subway: http://www.subway.com/nutrition/nutritionlist.aspx

Carl's Jr.: http://www.carlsjr.com/menu

Step 4: Calculate Information

Now that you have the basic information for your fast food meal, we are going to use the Math functions in Excel to calculate two more important pieces of data about your meal. Use the tabs below to complete each step

  • 1. Add Headers
  • 2. Caculate Non-Fat Calories
  • 3. Calculate Percentage
  • 4. Col. Totals
  • 4. Percent Total

Add Column Headers

Using the illustration below as a guide, add two more column headers to your spreadsheet.

Add two column headers

Now let's have Excel do some Math for us!

Calculate the Non-Fat Calories

View Tutorial View the video for this step.

First we'll calculate how many NON-FAT CALORIES are in each item of your meal. The math for this is:

calc nonfat calories

So, we need to subtract the number in cell C4 from the number in cell C3. The formula will look like this:

Formula to calculate non-fat calories

Use the fill down function to quickly calculate the rest of your charts.

Calculate Percent of Calories from Fat

Our next calculation will make it very easy for you to see how many calories in your meal come from fat. Think back to the reading in the first step where you learned what percentage of calories in any healthy food should come from fat. You'll soon see why this calculation will help you analyze the health of your meal.

Click to watch the video for this step View the video for this step.

The math for this calculation is: Formula to calculate percent of calories from fat

In Excel the function looks like this:

Excel percent from fat example

 

 

After we calculate the number, we have to change the number format of the cell to percentage so it is displayed in the correct format.

 

Right click cell and select Format cell FIRST, right click the cell and select Format Cells from the pop-up menu.
Format the cell for pecent

NEXT, follow the steps below:

  1. Select the Number tab.
  2. Select Percentage from the list.
  3. Make sure the Decimal Places is 0 (zero)

Calculate Column Totals

The last set of calculations you'll need to do is total your columns. Do the following for every column except the Percentage from Fat column.

Click to watch the video for this step Watch the video of this step.

First, select the cell under the column you wish to total up. select cell Second, click the Autosum button on the Ribbon (Home tab). Click Autosum
Third, make sure the range of cells is correct. Look for the dotted lines and make sure it includes the whole range of cells! Check the cell range Fourth, press enter to lock in the function and see the total. See the total displayed

After you have done this for each of your columns, your spreadsheet should look similar to the following (you'll see I've also formatted my table):

Table with totals and formatting

Click the last tab in this section to learn how to calculate the % of Calories from Fat column total. It can only be completed after you have finished the other column totals.

Calculate Percentage Total

The following steps help you calculate the percentage total.

Click to watch the video for this step Watch the video of this step.

Step 1: Insert percentage total

OneFirst, click in the cell just above the one we want to use for the total Percentage cell.

Then locate the small square in the lower right hand corner of the cell.

Step 2: Calculate total percentage from fat

twoNow, click on the square and drag the mouse down to the next cell immediately underneath. Look for the dotted lines around both cells.

Release the mouse when you see the dotted lines around both cells.

Step 3: Calculate Percentage of Calories from Fat

threeWhen you release the mouse, you'll see the Total Percentage from Fat displayed.

 

 

Step 5: Create Your Charts

Charts help us quickly see and process information visually. This is important as you try to convince people of the nutritional value of your meal.

Your final product must include at least two charts. Use the tabs below to learn how to create a bar chart and a pie chart. See several other sample charts you might also want to create.

  • Bar Chart
  • Pie Chart
  • Other Chart Samples

Creating a Bar Chart Comparing Fat and Non-Fat Calories

Bar charts are useful when comparing the same thing in many different things. In this chart, you will use a bar chart to compare the fat and non-fat calories of each item on your menu. You can then quickly spot the choices that aren't healthy and point them out to your audience.

Click to watch the video! Click to watch the video explaining how to create this chart.

When you have completed this chart it should be similar to the following:

Sample Chart 1

Creating a Pie Chart to Compare Total Calories from Fat and Non-Fat

Pie charts are useful when you want to show how the different parts of a whole compare to each other. In this chart we will compare the calories from fat and the calories that are non-fat and see how they compare to total calories. We know that in a healthy meal the calories from fat should be less that 35%, so this chart will very quickly reveal the nutritiousness of this meal.

Click to watch the video! Click to watch the video explaining how to create this chart.

When you have completed this chart it should be similar to the following:

Chart 2 Example

Other Chart Examples

Here are a few other sample charts you can create. Use the techniques learned to create the bar and pie charts in the other tabs of this section as you create these!

Chart 3

This chart uses a doughnut chart to show how many calories each item has compared to the calories in the whole meal. You can quickly see that most of the calories come from the Big Mac and the fries! We also finally see that while the Dr. Pepper may not have much fat, it sure does pack some calories!

Chart 3  Example

Chart 4

This chart uses the bar chart, which is very similar to the column chart to show the total grams of fat in each item. I used pictures of each item to make a stacked pictorial chart to add interest. This chart continues to point out that the Big Mac and the fries are the least healthy selections in this meal.

Chart 4 Example

Step 6: Put It All Together

When your project is complete, it will include the following elements:

one The name of your restaurant.
two

A nicely formatted table with each menu item and the following information about each:

column headers

Your table must include a row that totals each column as well.

three At least one logo or graphic from your restaurant.
four At least two charts that help you justify the nutritious value of your meal.
five A three or four sentence paragraph that explains why your meal is healthy or not healthy. You must use data from your spreadsheet to justify your explanation!
six YOUR NAME! Be sure to take credit for your work!!
   
   
   

Click here to see a sample project created using the Jack in the Box menu.

 

 

Project Rubric

Fast Food Fun To earn a NI- you must complete the following: To earn a NI you must complete the following: To earn a S you must complete the following: To earn an E you must complete the following:
Target Objective 1
Manipulate a spreadsheet: enter and format data and use formulas and functions.
Level 1 Indicator
Entered most data correctly, some incorrect formatting, attempted to use formulas and functions
Level 2 Indicator
Entered all data correctly, was able to format data, attempted to use formulas and functions
Level 3 Indicator
Entered all data correctly, completed required formatting, used formulas and functions correctly
Level 4 Indicator
Entered all data correctly, completed required formatting, used formulas and functions correctly, used advanced formatting techniques to design spreadsheet
Target Objective 2
Create bar charts to analyze data
.
Level 1 Indicator
Created minimal charts lacking correct chart elements; incorrect data displayed
Level 2 Indicator
Created minimal charts lacking correct chart elements; correct data displayed
Level 3 Indicator
Created required charts swith correct elements including title, names of axes, legend, and data labels; correct data displayed
Level 4 Indicator
Created required charts swith correct elements including title, names of axes, legend, and data labels; correct data displayed; used advanced charting techniques to design charts beyond requirements
Target Objective 3
Create pie charts to analyze data
.
Level 1 Indicator
Created minimal charts lacking correct chart elements; incorrect data displayed
Level 2 Indicator
Created minimal charts lacking correct chart elements; correct data displayed
Level 3 Indicator
Created required charts swith correct elements including title, legend, and data labels; correct data displayed
Level 4 Indicator
Created required charts with correct elements including title, legend, and data labels; correct data displayed; used advanced charting techniques to design charts beyond requirements
Target Objective 4
Summarize findings using a word processor and incorporating data and charts from spreadsheet
.
Level 1 Indicator
Able to copy chart from spreadsheet; brief summary with few details; no attempt to draw conclusions about data; did not meet requirements for length; did not used correct format
Level 2 Indicator
Able to copy chart from spreadsheet; brief summary with few details; some attempt to draw conclusions about data; made some attempt to meet length and format requirements
Level 3 Indicator
Able to copy chart from spreadsheet; summary included required details; was able to meet length and format requirements
Level 4 Indicator
Able to copy chart from spreadsheet; detailed summary with additional information beyond required elements; met or exceeded length and format requirements
 

New Updates!

For the past few weeks I've been working to put together a site for our teachers in Lake Stevens to easily find sample SBA questions that help them understand how students will be tested each year. This often leads to deeper understanding of the standards themselves. Click on over to the SBA Samples site and easily find all the CCSS Standards by grade level and any sample questions in the format used on the Smarter Balanced Assessment.